Marcel Oosterwijk via FLICKR

Education reforms in Kenya

This African Policy Dialogue aims to generate research evidence on education reforms in Kenya and to inform current policies, especially the reforms that can be undertaken to ensure that the education system provides quality education and training to all children and youth in Kenya.

Led by People’s Action for Learning Network (PAL Network)

About the policy dialogue

One of the challenges of education in Kenya is inequality, which means that those from low socio-economic backgrounds have difficulty accessing education. Since independence in 1963, Kenya has constituted six commissions and several taskforces to reform the education system to meet the country’s social, political and economic needs. Central to the education reforms in Kenya has been establishing an education system that addresses relevance, equity, inclusion and waste. Most recently, in 2017, the government embarked on the most comprehensive education reform since 1981, which has seen the introduction of the Competency Based Curriculum (CBC). The aim of the CBC is to guarantee basic education for every learner according to their abilities and needs. Education reforms emphasize that all children, especially those from marginalized groups and those with disabilities, should have access to education. Despite these reforms, challenges related to access, equity, quality, relevance and efficiency in the management of education resources are yet to be adequately addressed. Furthermore, implementation of the CBC has been marred by uncertainties, as it is increasingly becoming evident that the reforms may not necessarily close the equity gaps. This African Policy Dialogue (APD), therefore, aims to generate research evidence on education reforms in Kenya and to inform current policies and reforms, to ensure that the education system provides quality education and training to all children and youth in Kenya.

Partners

  • People’s Action for Learning Network (PAL Network)
  • Other actors: students/learners from different education levels; government agencies; teachers’ unions and associations; research institutions; teacher training colleges; parents’ associations; lateral and multilateral donor agencies involved in education and curriculum reform; and private sector agencies
Objectives
  • To examine the extent to which the current education reforms address education challenges, such as exclusion and inequality in terms of geography, gender, access and quality
  • To build and sustain a network of researchers,  policymakers, practitioners and other non-state actors to deliberate on emerging evidence on the impact of the CBC on education quality and attainment for marginalized children to inform the formulation and implementation of programmes
  • To assemble and repackage evidence-based policy  options that suggest different ways of addressing inclusion that benefits vulnerable people
  • To review seven key policies on education in Kenya with a view to identifying the gaps that hinder equity, inclusion and improved learning outcomes
Country focus
  • Kenya