Policy highlights:

  • In many African countries, non-formal education has a long tradition, but formal recognition of prior- or informal learning is not the norm. As a result, the potential of informal learning is not being sufficiently tapped.
  • However, in several African nations – including Mauritius, Botswana, and Namibia – policy to promote recognition of prior learning is already being implemented for a variety of reasons: 1) to widen access to higher education; 2) to more effectively include skilled, but informally-educated, people into the (formal) workforce; 3) to make up for the shortage of tertiary institutions; and 4) to promote equality and economic growth.
  • To ensure the recognition of non-formal education has a positive and constructive impact, a number of shifts are necessary, including: 1) moving from a centralized, state-controlled system to a decentralized, coordinated partnership system; 2) focusing on the professional inclusion of youth, for example, by adopting standards based on actual skills, rather than on diploma acquisition, 3) broadening the scope of skills training with more room for apprenticeships and on-the-job learning; and 4) collaborating with private-sector stakeholders to implement quality assurance for non-formal and informal learning.
Connected themes
Share this post

Related items

AERC Regional Policy Forum summary

The AERC hosted a virtual Regional Policy Forum on 28 March 2022. The forum brought together key stakeholders who play important roles in shaping new research findings, paving new policy directions, and initiating innovative practices in the areas of youth and employment.

Getting up to speed with inclusive development

The INCLUDE team’s reading list: March 2022 Every month we share with our readers a…

cairo-workers
Identifying Economic Sectors to Create Employment for Youth in Africa: key findings from selected country cases

Growth Sectors for Youth Employment (GSYE) is an African Economic Research Consortium (AERC) collaborative research…

John_maara_Photo_
Getting up to speed with inclusive development

The INCLUDE team’s reading list: February 2022

The world youngest continent is looking for work

The African continent is undergoing an important demographic transformation that will, for the better or the worse, drastically change its labor market. According to the World Bank, every year 12 million young people enter the job market while only 3 million formal jobs are created. With a median age of 25 years old, the African continent is the youngest in the world.

Maya Turolla Profile