Utafiti Sera on employment in Kenya, one of the African Policy Dialogues encouraging evidence based policy making to enhance inclusive development in Kenya, has developed as a policy brief that focuses on the horticulture sub-sector. The key messages from this policy brief are as follows.

  • Despite improved overall economic performance, the horticulture industry has experienced reduced/stagnating job creation mainly due to weak governance of contracts, low labor productivity and limited market access.
  • Interventions aimed at enhancing competitiveness of the industry in the domestic, regional and global markets can help unlock the blockages to wage employment creation.
  • Such interventions can include investment in appropriate research and technologies/innovations; designing volunteer programs that minimize skills erosion, enforcement of horticultural codes of practice, strengthening farmer institutions and investment in appropriate infrastructure.
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  • Creating employment in horticulture sector in Kenya: Productivity, contracting and marketing policies Download Policy brief
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