Policy highlights:

  • A public-private-producer partnership (PPPP) is a cooperative mechanism through which development actors (public) work with companies (private) to improve the way that agricultural markets work for small-scale farmers and rural communities (producers).
  • PPPPs have been established to improve market access and conditions in rural areas with the aim of increasing farmers’ incomes and promoting broader rural development.
  • PPPPs can be seen as a variation of current chain models rather than a radical change. They provide opportunities for farmers, but also raise implementation challenges.
  • Based on case studies in Uganda, Rwanda, Ghana and Indonesia, eight factors contributing to the success of PPPPs were identified:
    • a clearly defined rationale and assumptions within the partnership;
    • the presence of a market pull;
    • farmer ownership of the PPPP;
    • trust and incentives within the partnership;
    • risk identification, distribution and mitigation;
    • capacity to respond to complex market changes;
    • public accountability and transparency;
    • making sure the PPPP facilitates a sustainable market system.
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